Silentium Victoriam Accelerat

The United States Office of Censorship operated from December 19, 1941 through August 15, 1945 to censor international wartime communications.

When President Roosevelt created the office, he wrote:

All Americans abhor censorship, just as they abhor war. But the experience of this and of all other Nations has demonstrated that some degree of censorship is essential in wartime, and we are at war.

Read Roosevelt’s entire executive order here.

Byron Price, the executive editor of the Associated Press was appointed the first and only Director of Censorship. Price’s biggest task during the war was to keep secret information about development of the atomic bomb.¬† Price’s office developed the “Code of Wartime Practices” which, although voluntary for American radio and press outlets, made clear that certain pieces of information were not to be published.

The office operated under the motto Silentium Victoriam Accelerat, which from Latin translates Silence Speeds Victory.

Interesting further reading:
Secrets to Victory
Wikipedia

censorshippin

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